Take Me Out to the Ballgame: Books About Baseball

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Model Magic Bat and Baseball by Ria

March 31 is Opening Day for Major League Baseball, and most of the kids in Pacifica are already deep into softball and Little League practice.  So this week, I did a storytime about baseball.  Here’s what we read:

randy

Randy Riley’s Really Big Hit by Chris Van Dusen (Amazon.com link)

This book is nominated for the 2014-2015 California Young Reader Medal, and I had already shared it with some second grade classes last month.  It’s a rhyming story about a boy who is terrible at baseball, but a genius at invention.  When he looks through his telescope and sees a giant fireball rocketing towards Earth, Randy Riley quickly invents a robot who hits the greatest home run ever, and saves the town.  This one was a really big hit with the kids in my storytime group, and quickly got snatched up at the end.

homer

Homer by Diane de Groat and Shelley Rotner (Amazon.com link)

The story about a dog baseball game featuring a big golden retriever named Homer, this is an adorable, funny book told in photographs.   The kids got into a mini-scuffle over who would get to check it out.

abbott

Who’s On First? by Abbott and Costello; illustrated by John Martz (Amazon.com link)

An illustrated version of the classic Abbott and Costello routine.  This would be a fun one to read with a partner, or use for Reader’s Theater.  The illustrator makes each player (Who, What, I Don’t Know, etc.) a different animal, making them easy to identify as the joke continues.  I’m not sure that all the kids got the joke, but they laughed as the dialogue got more heated and complicated, and several of them asked to check it out at the end.

tball

Froggy Plays T-Ball by Jonathan London; illustrated by Frank Remkiewicz (Amazon.com link)

The Froggy books are always a hit, especially because the kids love joining in on yelling, “FROGGGYYY!”  (It’s a great opportunity to point out the word on the page too, which is important for pre-readers).   In this book, Froggy makes several mistakes at his T-ball game: throwing himself out, catching actual flies instead of fly balls, and finally running towards his real home, instead of home plate.

SONGS:

B-I-N-G-O!  I sang this to go along with Homer, and used a dog puppet, who barked the missing letters, and licked the kids’ faces in between verses.

Take Me Out to the Ball Game  We did this as a sing-along, and I played it on the ukelele.  (I found the chords on Ultimate-Guitar.com).

INSTRUMENT PLAY-ALONG WITH A CD: I’m Gonna’ Catch You by Laurie Berkner, from Under a Shady Tree: a catchy song with a brief baseball reference.

CRAFT: Model Magic Baseballs

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Model Magic Baseballs, Soccer Balls, and a Bat by Olivia

This ended up being a lot of fun.  Originally, I had planned to just use white Model Magic for the ball, and have the kids draw in the lines for the seams with a red marker.  But I had a tiny bit of red Model Magic left in my bin, along with a package of black, so the kids ended up rolling thin strips of the red for the baseball seams instead.  They also used the black to make soccer balls, and some of them even made baseball bats.

If you aren’t familiar with Model Magic, it’s a soft, light, air-dry modeling clay made by Crayola, and available in most craft stores and on Amazon.com.  It worked beautifully for the balls, because it actually bounces.  It’s also light enough that, even if the kids threw the balls at one another, they wouldn’t hurt.  My son has used Model Magic for years to make little models of whatever he was interested in at the time: Pokemon, Mario, etc.  It’s far less messy than Play-Doh, and really easy to manipulate.

OTHER BASEBALL BOOKS

I also read baseball books to two classes of second graders this week, which was fun because I could share some of the longer ones.  Here’s what I read:

Becoming Babe Ruth by Matt Tavares (Amazon.com link)

The second graders enjoyed this true story about George Herman Ruth, who was such a troublemaker as a child that his parents sent him away to St. Mary’s Industrial School for Boys.  St. Mary’s was strict (the boys could even be whipped if they so much as talked at mealtime), but the one thing that George loved there was baseball.  After he became a professional ball player, he heard that St. Mary’s had been destroyed in a fire, so he invited the school’s band to join him for the rest of the baseball season, and raised money to help them rebuild.   Very readable, with large, colorful illustrations.

Casey Back at Bat by Dan Gutman; illustrated by Steve Johnson and Lou Fancher (Amazon.com link)

A funny follow-up to the old poem, Casey at the Bat.  In this story, Casey hits the ball, which rockets off over the fence, knocks the Tower of Pisa, breaks the nose off the Sphinx, scares the dinosaurs into hiding, and plummets back onto the field, where Casey is flied out.  The kids enjoyed the outrageous silliness of it, and it gave me a chance to put in a plug for Gutman’s chapter book series, The Baseball Card Adventures.  These are sports adventure stories for slightly older kids (grades 4-8) about a boy who uses baseball cards to travel back in time to meet famous ball players.

Casey at the Bat by Ernest L. Thayer; illustrated by C. F. Payne (Amazon.com link)

One of the second grade teachers had this book in her classroom, and pulled it out so the kids could hear the original poem.  Some of the vocabulary is a bit advanced, but the illustrations by C. F. Payne do a great job of conveying the story.  The kids all seemed to enjoy it.

There Goes Ted Williams by Matt Tavares (Amazon.com link)

This was the favorite of a lot of the boys.  Another picture book biography by Matt Tavares (author of Becoming Babe Ruth).  This one tells the story of Ted Williams’ rise to fame as the greatest hitter who ever lived.  It includes an exciting anecdote about how his plane was damaged by enemy fire in the Korean War, forcing him to choose between ejecting and possibly breaking his legs, or taking his chances with a crash.  The kids also were appreciatively grossed out by the description of Williams hitting until blood streamed down his hands.  My only complaint about this book is that the kids were curious about when Williams lived and died, which wasn’t included in the text or the notes at the end.  But the kids in both classes loved it.

What are your favorite picture books about baseball?

Oh, the Places We’ll Go! A Celebration of Dr. Seuss

Dr. Seuss’ Birthday (his 110th, if he were still with us) was on March 2, so a Dr. Seuss storytime was definitely in order for this week.  It’s not as easy as it might sound, because most of his books are too long for the baby/toddler crowd.   But a number of his easy reader books still fit the bill for my Family Storytime.

I’m still in awe of Dr. Seuss.  I don’t think anyone’s ever quite matched his genius for telling compelling stories in memorable rhymed verse using simple language, all with unforgettable characters and artwork.   As a kid, I think I owned only three of his books: The Eye Book; Thidwick the Big-Hearted Moose (which is admittedly a bit dark, but I was obsessed with it); and The Cat and the Hat Comes Back.  (Although oddly, not The Cat in the Hat).  I read them each countless times.  The Eye Book was actually the very first book I remember reading on my own.  (It’s also the first book I remember reading that mentioned pink underpants!)

For Family Storytime, I had pulled a wide selection of Seuss books.  I was hoping to get to The Cat and the Hat or Green Eggs and Ham, but the storytime audience that night was large, with a number of younger, wiggly guys, so I stuck to the shorter ones (although oddly, a number of these are not actually illustrated by Dr. Seuss).  The kids loved them all.

I started out the storytime by asking the kids if they knew what Dr. Seuss’ real name was.  Most of them didn’t know, or had forgotten, that it was Theodor Seuss Geisel.  I also like to point out that a lot of his books, especially the beginning readers, were written under the pseudonym Theo LeSeig (in many libraries, these are often shelved under L instead of S, which can make them hard for kids to find).

wacky

Wacky Wednesday by Theo. LeSeig; illustrated by George Booth (Amazon.com link)

This one actually ended up being a bit tricky, because the kids kept popping up and down in front of me in their eagerness to point to the wacky things happening on each page.  Finally, I stood up so they could all see.  In spite of that, they were all mesmerized.  My daughter loves this book, and laughs at every wacky illustration.

octember

Please Try to Remember the First of Octember by Theo. LeSieg; illustrated by Art Cumings (Amazon.com link)

I actually wasn’t familiar with this one until I helped someone find it on the shelf last week.  What a great book!  The narrator promises a boy that he can have absolutely anything he wants…on the first of Octember.  I love that it’s kind of a wish fulfillment book, with money falling from the sky, skateboard TVs, swimming books, giant hammocks, and other fantasies from the mind of Dr. Seuss.  It would make a great lead-in to a drawing/writing assignment for elementary school students: what you ask for on the first of Octember?

eye

The Eye Book by Theo. LeSieg; illustrated by Joe Mathieu (Amazon.com link)

As I mentioned above, this was the first book I remember reading on my own, and I’m pretty sure I can recite the whole thing from memory.  I still consider it one of the best books for beginning readers.  The text is simple, with repeated phrases (“They see a _____,” “They look at ______”).  The rhymes and illustrations help kids decipher the new words.  It’s also a great book for a classroom unit or storytime about the five senses.

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The Foot Book by Dr. Seuss (Amazon.com link)

A great book for teaching left and right.  I actually had the kids stand up and act it out: standing on their left or right foot, holding their feet up, etc.   It was also the shortest of the books I read, and was the perfect one to end with.  I paired it with The Hokey Pokey the next day for a Toddler Storytime, and it was a hit there as well.

SONGS:

I did several active songs like Shake My Sillies Out and Five Monkeys Jumping on the Bed, to give the little guys a chance to move around.  Then I had the kids grab stuffed animals to dance with for Waltzing with Bears.  This song was written by Dale Marven (not Seamus Kennedy, as I had written originally.  Thanks for Mike for the correction), but based on a song from Dr. Seuss’ Cat in the Hat Songbook called My Uncle Terwilliger Waltzes With Bears.  Here are the lyrics as I remember them, along with the uke chords I used.  Click on the triangle to hear the first verse and chorus:

Waltzing with Bears

G                                               C                          G
My uncle Walter goes waltzing with bears.
D            G
It’s a most unbearable state of affairs.
G                                                                C                          G
Every Saturday night, he creeps down the backstairs,
G             C                  G                                D                     G
Sneaks out of the house and goes waltzing with bears!

CHORUS
G                                             C                        G
He goes wa-wa-wa-wa, waltzing with bears,
D                                                     G
Raggy bears, shaggy bears, baggy bears too.
G                                                             C                         G
There’s nothing on earth Uncle Walter won’t do,
G    C                G                C                    G
So he can go waltzing, wa-wa-wa-waltzing,
G   C                  G                D                       G
So he can go waltzing, waltzing with bears!

I went to his room in the middle of the night.
I tiptoed inside and turned on the light.
But to my surprise there was no one in sight.
I’m sure Uncle Walter goes waltzing at night!

CHORUS

I gave Uncle Walter a new coat to wear,
But when he came home he was covered with hair,
And lately I’ve noticed there’s several new tears,
I’m sure Uncle Walter goes waltzing with bears!

CHORUS

We asked Uncle Walter, “Why won’t you be good?
And do all the things that we say you should?
We know that you’d rather be out in the wood,
We’re afraid that we’ll lose you, lose you for good!”

CHORUS

We begged and we pleaded, “€œOh please won’t you stay!”
And managed to keep him at home for a day,
But the bears all barged in, and they took him away!
Now he’s waltzing with pandas, and he can’t understand us,
And the bears all demand at least one dance a day!

CHORUS

CRAFT: Cat in the Hat Fruit Kebabs

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There are a number of variations of this snack ideas online, including some that use grapes, marshmallows or bananas to make the head of the cat.  For mine, I printed this picture from PBSkids.org, then cut out the cat, cutting off his hat.  I taped the picture onto wooden chopsticks for the kids, then gave them bowls of bananas and strawberries to make the hat.  They didn’t last long!  This would be a fun and healthy patterning activity too.

OTHER BOOKS BY DR. SEUSS

Fox in Socks by Dr. Seuss (Amazon.com linkRecommended by Jeanine Asche

Talk about a reading challenge: this book is full of tongue-twisters that get harder and crazier with each page!

Marvin K. Mooney, Will You Please Go Now? by Dr. Seuss (Amazon.com linkRecommended by Lindsey Tear

Between this book and Thidwick the Big-Hearted Moose, I get the impression that Dr. Seuss had trouble with unwanted houseguests.  This is a fun one to read aloud.  Lindsey, who recommended it, also mentioned this interesting fact from Wikipedia: “In a July 1974 collaboration with political humorist Art Buchwald, Dr. Seuss took a two-year-old copy of his book, crossed out ‘Marvin K. Mooney’ wherever it occurred and wrote in ‘Richard M. Nixon’. With Dr. Seuss’s consent, Buchwald and his editors reprinted the markup as a newspaper column, published July 30, 1974. Beset by Watergate, U.S. President Nixon resigned ten days later on August 9.”

One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish by Dr. Seuss (Amazon.com linkRecommended by Linda Anderson

My son used to demand to hear this one every night for what felt like weeks!  It’s a wild ride through all manner of wacky Dr. Seuss inventions: Yinks and Yops and Zans and Gox and lots and lots of fish.

Oh, the Places You’ll Go! by Dr. Seuss (Amazon.com linkRecommended by Linda Anderson and Michelle Rosoff

I still have the copy of this my parents gave me when I graduated high school.   A great read for any age, describing all the ups and downs, frustrations and hopes of growing up.

What Was I Scared Of? by Dr. Seuss (Amazon.com linkRecommended by Ria Tajbl

I know this story from the Seuss collection called The Sneetches and Other Stories.  I didn’t realize it had since been published as a separate picture book with glow-in-the-dark ink.  It’s a fun, slightly spooky story about pale green pants “with nobody inside them!”  A good read-aloud for a storytime about emotions and fear.

I Can Lick 30 Tigers Today! and Other Stories by Dr. Seuss (Amazon.com link) Recommended by Michael Lambert

I admit I don’t think I’ve ever read this one, but I will have to check it out!  A bold, little version of The Cat in the Hat brags that he can beat 30 tigers, but then reconsiders until the number gets smaller and smaller.  Michael Lambert, who recommended this one, also mentioned that one of the other stories in this collection, King Louie Katz, is a great one for storytime.

The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss (Amazon.com linkRecommended by Maria Kurland

Another childhood classic about a wonderful, naughty character.  As a kid, I always wished the Cat in the Hat would pop by my house for a visit, in spite of all the trouble he caused.

I Had Trouble in Getting to Solla-Sollew by Dr. Seuss (Amazon.com linkRecommended by Thomas Moore

My parents are always telling me “there is no Utopia,” and this book is proof.  When the hero of this book stubs his toe, he decides to move to “the City of Solla Sollew, on the banks of the beautiful River Wah-Hoo, where they never have troubles! At least, very few.”  Until he gets there, and realizes every place has its problems.

What is your favorite Dr. Seuss book and why?

What a Feeling! Books about Emotions

Emotion Wheel by Olivia

Emotion Wheel by Olivia

This week for Family Storytime, I read books about emotions.  I noticed that most of the books out there with that theme focus on negative emotions like anger and fear, but they are some of my favorites.  Here are the ones we read:

grumpy

What are You So Grumpy About? by Tom Lichtenheld (Amazon.com link)

This book does a great job of illustrating the frustrations of being a kid: boring grown-up conversations that never end; trips to dull museums; bland grown-up cereals.  Tom Lichtenheld takes each one to an hilarious extreme, ending with the worst: somebody making you laugh when you were trying to be grumpy, and making you forget what you were grumpy about.  This one always gets laughs, from the parents as well as the kids.

friend

My Friend is Sad by Mo Willems (Amazon.com link)

My favorite of the Elephant and Piggie books, and one of the best for very beginning readers.   When Piggie sees that Gerald is sad, she tries to cheer him up by dressing as a cowboy, a clown, and a robot, but only makes him feel worse.  I had the kids say the repeated “Ohhhhh”s along with Gerald.   A good, funny story about friendship as well as emotion.  The kids all loved it.  By now they are all so familiar with Gerald and Piggie books that they couldn’t wait to get to the end page, which always has Mo Willem’s Pigeon hidden inside of one of the illustrations.

mousemad

Mouse Was Mad by Linda Urban; illustrated by Henry Cole (Amazon.com link)

This is one of the best picture books about coping with anger.   Mouse is so angry, he jumps up and down, stomps his feet, screams, and rolls on the ground.  The problem is that other animals (hare, bear, bobcat, and hedgehog), each do those things much better, and when he tries to emulate them, he always ends up falling into a mucky mud puddle and getting even angrier.  Finally, he stands still…and breathes…something he can do better than anyone else.  A great way to teach an important skill for regaining calm, but taught in the context of a lively, non-preachy read-aloud.  My daughter, who could teach bobcat a thing or two about screaming, loves this book, so I’m hoping its quiet lesson will rub off.

crankenstein

Crankenstein by Samantha Berger; illustrated by Dan Santat (Amazon.com link)

Another funny book about being grumpy.  Crankenstein is a monster.  When you say, “Good Morning!  How are you?” he says, “MEHRRRR!”  He also says “MEHRRR” to lots of other things: getting ready for school, standing in long lines, and going to bed.  But then he meets another Crankenstein, who makes him laugh.  The kids enjoyed joining in on the “MEHRRR’s,” and this one grabbed the attention of some of the boys who love monsters.

SONGS:

If You’re Happy And You Know It:  I added new verses with other emotions: If you’re sad and you know it, cry ‘Boohoo!’;  If you’re shy and you know it, hide your face…peek-a-boo!;  If you’re grumpy and you know it, stomp your feet; etc.

INSTRUMENT PLAY WITH A CD:

My Energy by Laurie Berkner from Under a Shady Tree (Amazon.com link)

CRAFT: Emotion wheel

Emotion wheel by Sarah

Emotion wheel by Sarah

This was an easy craft I found on the Allen County Public Library Youth Services web site, on a page with a list of other good books and songs about emotions.  I adapted it a little, and created a Word document with circles for the kids to draw faces in.  You can print the template here.  I also cut out arrows out of cardstock, and punched holes in them for the metal brads (I attached the arrows to the page ahead of time because that part seemed a little tricky, and the brads are a bit sharp.  I just pushed them through the middle of the paper and twisted them a bit until the arrow could spin easily, then separated the metal tabs on the back of the page to hold them in place).

The kids had fun drawing in their faces.  I liked that this made for a simple reading activity too, since they had to learn the emotion word (happy, sad, angry, or scared), in order to know what kind of face to draw.

OTHER BOOKS:

The great thing about this theme is that you can really use just about any picture book and talk about the emotions the characters may be feeling.

Today I Feel Silly: And Other Moods that Make My Day by Jamie Lee Curtis; illustrated by Laura Cornell (Amazon.com link)

One of the few celebrity authors I actually like.  In this book Jamie Lee Curtis explores a wide range of emotions based on situations that kids can easily relate to: feeling angry at not being included in a friend’s playdate; being sad after a fight with a friend; feeling happy at learning how to do something new.  The text is simple, well-written rhymed verse, and the illustrations are whimsical and full of feeling.  The book comes with an emotion wheel at the back, although I noticed the one from the library copy we have was missing.

How Are You Peeling?  Foods with Moods by Saxton Freymann and Joost Eiffers (Amazon.com link)

The emotional vegetables and fruits in this book, all made from actual food, are hilarious: angry peppers, kissing strawberries, joyful peas.  This is a great book for a food-themed storytime as well.

Baby Happy, Baby Sad by Leslie Patricelli (Amazon.com link)

Perfect for babies, toddlers, and beginning readers, this board book goes through all the things that make baby happy (getting an ice cream!) and sad (dropping the ice cream).

Katie Loves the Kittens by John Himmelman (Amazon.com link)

I’m including this one because it does a great job of conveying a common experience that everyone, especially young kids, can relate to: being SO excited that you rush in and do something you regret later.  This story is about an adorable dog named Katie, and three little kittens.  When her owner brings home three new kittens, Katie can’t contain herself: she rushes in howling and scares the kittens.  Then she feels ashamed and sad.  The cycle repeats several times, until she finally learns to control her excitement.  The illustrations are darling (no one conveys shame better than a dog), and it’s a terrific read-aloud, with lots of opportunities for kids to howl.

Llama Llama Red Pajama by Anna Dewdney (Amazon.com link)

Another story all parents and kids can relate to: Llama Llama feels alone and scared in bed, while Mama Llama is on the phone downstairs.  Adorable rhyming book with wonderful illustrations.  Many of the other Llama Llama books (Llama Llama Mad at Mama; Llama Llama Misses Mama) would work for this theme as well.

When Sophie Gets Angry…Really Really Angry by Molly Bang (Amazon.com link) Recommended by Jeanine Asche and Erica Hohmann

Vivid colors and bold descriptions capture just how it feels to be really, really angry, and how Sophie calms down.   This is a simple story about a little girl’s frustration and anger that kids can easily relate to, and one that conveys both the overwhelming feeling of rage and the fact that it eventually passes.

Grumpy Gertie by Sam Lloyd (Amazon.com link) Recommended by Shelley Jacobsen

I haven’t read this one yet, but it looks like a fun, simple way to teach kids that the face they project to the world can affect others.  Gertie is determined to tell the world just how grumpy she is, until a monkey teaches her how to turn her frown upside down.

The Pout Pout Fish by Deborah Diesen; illustrated by Daniel X. Hanna (Amazon.com link) Recommended by Kim Day

Adorable rhyming story about a pouty fish, whose ocean friends all try to cheer him up, until he turns upside down and becomes a kissy fish instead.

What are your favorite books about emotions?

Ringing in the New Year

I had so much fun at this week’s storytime, seeing most of my regular families, and some I hadn’t seen in a long time.  Auld Acquaintances!  But if there are any publishers, children’s authors, or aspiring children’s authors reading this, please take note: there is a desperate shortage of books about New Year’s.   

I had pulled or ordered over every book I could find in our system on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day.  There weren’t many, not even on Amazon, and the ones I found were mostly too long to read at story time.  There are LOTS of books on Chinese New Year, which I’m looking forward to covering in a few weeks.  But publishers appear to have dropped the ball on New Year’s Eve, and I don’t mean the one in Times Square.

I ended up resorting to an odd mix of books about babies (in honor of Baby New Year) and parties and the year in general.   Luckily there are a fair number of these.  These were the ones I ended up reading:

newyears

The Night Before New Year’s by Natasha Wing; illustrated by Amy Wummer (Amazon.com link)

The only actual New Year’s book I read.  It’s a rhymed book, and the meter is awkward in some places, but overall it meets my requirements for a good holiday book: it covers the major traditions without being dry, and tells a story in the process.  In this case, it’s about a girl and her brother who want to stay up until midnight on New Year’s Eve, but don’t quite make it.   The kids enjoyed this one, and it was eagerly snatched up at the end.  After the book, we all counted down from 10 and yelled, “Happy New Year!”  It would have been fun to throw confetti too, except for the inevitable clean-up.

Mustache Baby by Bridget Heos; illustrated by Joy Ang (Amazon.com link)

Okay, this was a stretch, but I justified it by mentioning Baby New Year.  I had originally pulled this one because it was on a list of best picture books published in 2013 (a topic I will be covering soon).  And the kids loved it!  There was even a minor brawl over it at the end.  When a baby is born with a mustache, the delivery nurse tells his startled family that they need to find out if it’s a good guy mustache or a bad guy mustache.  The baby starts out taking on all kinds of good mustachioed roles: cowboy, Spanish painter, sword fighter, and man of the law.  But then the mustache begins to curl on the ends…  The illustrations are very funny.

Frog and Toad All Year by Arnold Lobel (Amazon.com link)

I read the first story in this early chapter book, partly because it fit the theme of a new year, and partly because there’s an Arnold Lobel exhibit at the Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco, including a concert of songs based on his works on January 12.   I also thought it would fun for some of the Kindergartners in my storytime to get to know Frog and Toad, who were favorite characters from my old childhood.  In the story I read, Frog drags Toad out on a cold winter day, and gets him to go sledding.

Xander’s Panda Party by Linda Sue Park; illustrated by Matt Phelan (Amazon.com link)

Another stretch, but I justified it because it was about a party.  Xander wants to throw a panda party, but since he’s the only panda at the zoo, he reconsiders and invites all the bears.  When he finds out the koala isn’t really a bear, he extends his invitation to mammals, but rhinoceros insists on bringing his bird.  In the end, of course, he ends up inviting every creature at the zoo, including the people.  Cute rhyming story that the kids seemed to enjoy.  It got checked out immediately too.

CRAFT: Decorated Calendars

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Calendars decorated by Alyssa, Jonas and Sarah

I happened to be at Michael’s the other day, and picked up a bunch of small picture frame calendars for 60 cents each.  The kids had fun drawing, stickering, and collaging on them with pictures I cut from magazines.   A cheaper way to go would be to print out calendars (or even just the month of January) from CalendarLabs.com and have the kids decorate those.

OTHER BOOKS:

The Stars Will Still Shine by Cynthia Rylant; illustrated by Tiphanie Beeke (Amazon.com link)

This is actually a really sweet book, that would work well for New Year’s, even for toddlers.  It’s a lovely poem about all the nice things that will remain the same: “…this new year/the sky will still be there/the stars will still shine/birds will fly over us/church bells will chime…we shall have peaches/we shall have pie/we shall have ice cream three scoops high”   The illustrations are soft, colorful, and peaceful.

Squirrel’s New Year’s Resolution by Pat Miller; illustrated by Kathi Ember (Amazon.com link)

This one was a bit too long for my storytime, but I liked that it addresses the idea of writing New Year’s Resolutions, which might have been a fun craft idea too.  Squirrel is frustrated that she can’t come up with any resolutions of her own, but she ends up helping each of her friends keep theirs.

Shanté Keys and the New Year Peas by Gail Piernas-Davenport; illustrated by Marian Eldridge (Amazon.com linkSubmitted by Lindsey Tear

Grandma has made all the lucky foods for New Year’s Day, but she forgot the black-eyed peas.  So Shanté Keys sets out to find some.  I haven’t seen this one yet, but I’ve requested a copy for our library system.   As a kid, we always had kidney beans, cornbread, and collard greens for New Year’s Day, a tradition that I miss, so I can empathize with Shanté Keys.

Happy New Year, Pooh! by Kathlein Weidner Zoehfield (Amazon.com linkSubmitted by Lindsey Tear

This book is out of print, unfortunately, but it looks sweet.  Winnie the Pooh and his friends are sad to see that the calendar has come to an end, until Christopher Robin tells them they have a whole new year ahead.

Frog and Toad Together by Arnold Lobel (Amazon.com link) Submitted by Barbara Bruxvoort

Another Frog and Toad book, but one that may be even more appropriate for New Year’s.   It’s even referenced in this article on keeping your New Year’s resolutions.   The two stories that fit best are “A List,” where Toad makes a list of things he plans to do, and “Cookies,” where Frog and Toad try to find the willpower not to eat all the cookies.

P. Bear’s New Year’s Eve Party by Paul Owen Lewis (Amazon.com link) Submitted by Neeru Penumella

This one isn’t in our library system either, probably because it’s only available in paperback, but it looks like fun.  The book uses the arrival of each of P. Bear’s friends to demonstrate counting and telling time.

Are there any great New Year’s books I’m missing out on?  Please share them in the comments.